Langara College’s The Voice

STORIFY: Langara journalism panel questions the future of the industry

Posted on November 21, 2014

On Oct. 23, Frances Bula moderated Journalism: The Next 50 Years, a panel to celebrate the program's 50th anniversary. Photo: Vivian Chui

On Oct. 23, Frances Bula moderated Journalism: The Next 50 Years, a panel to celebrate the program’s 50th anniversary. Photo: Vivian Chui

On Oct. 23, Langara College held “Journalism: The Next 50 Years,” a panel in celebration of 50 years of its journalism program at the CBC.

Journalism department chair and Globe & Mail reporter Frances Bula moderated the event, and the panel included: Jane Armstrong, Editor-in-Chief, The Tyee; Alison Broddle, Executive Producer, News, CBC/Radio-Canada; Gary Mason, National Affairs Columnist, The Globe and Mail; Harold Munro, Editor-in-Chief, The Vancouver Sun; Simi Sara, Host of The Simi Sara Show, CKNW.

Audience members included many journalists, grads and current students of the journalism program. Throughout the event, the audience tweeted using the hashtag #LJ50, for Langara Journalism 50 Years. Audience members also including Vancouver Sun’s Kim Bolan, who teaches journalism law, and CBC’s Peg Fong, who teaches ethics in the Langara journalism program.

A screen shot of my Storify on the Langara journalism panel.

A screen shot of my Storify on the Langara journalism panel.

The Storify I have linked includes tweets from the audience and Langara journalism alumni. Unfortunately, it would not work with my version of WordPress.

Also see Vivian Chui‘s story on page 2 of the Oct. 30 issue of The Voice as well as Ash Kelly‘s story and video (below) on J-Source. For more tweets, Langara College also put together a Storify of the event.

There will be more events as part of Langara journalism’s 50th anniversary in 2015. The program first started in 1965.

I live-tweeted this event for The Voice.

Can’t buy booze with your groceries yet? Two stores in South Vancouver can

Posted on  March 27, 2014

Vancouver grocery stores can now sell alcohol due to B.C. government’s new rule, but only two stores fit the qualifications. (Google)

Vancouver grocery stores can now sell alcohol due to B.C. government’s new rule, but only two stores fit the qualifications. (Google)Despite the hype surrounding the announcement that grocery stores will be allowed to sell booze, only two Vancouver stores qualify under a recent restriction.

Despite the hype surrounding the announcement that grocery stores will be allowed to sell booze, only two Vancouver stores qualify under a recent restriction.

Earlier this month the B.C. government declared grocery stores could sell alcohol using a ‘store-within-a-store’ model that would require a separate checkout. According to the government, this was to “safeguard health and safety and ensure restricted access to alcohol by minors.”

While consumers prepared for some one-stop shopping, the government released an update forbidding any grocery-based liquor stores from operating within one kilometre of existing standalone liquor shops.

As reported in The Vancouver Sun, the only two stores in Vancouver that fit that parameter are the Choices outlets on West 16th and West 57th avenues. Both are located in the south Vancouver area, as is a Safeway at that won’t be selling alcohol.

Neither Safeway nor Choices responded to multiple interview requests.

Students appreciate easy access to alcohol

Devan Fast, a Langara health sciences student, isn’t concerned that so few stores will benefit.

“I don’t think [the new rule will] make a difference,” said Fast. “There’s usually a liquor store pretty close to most grocery stores anyways, a couple of blocks away at most.”

Paul Lichtblau, a Langara geography sciences student, said he was looking forward to the new integrated stores.

“I think it’s a matter of time,” said Lichtblau. “Cuts down on travel time to the liquor store.”

UPDATE:

Langara Nursing receives top review from College of Nurses

Posted on March 21, 2014

First year nursing student Dynne Gaborni practices measuring blood pressure on a Langara student. (Erin Boe)

First year nursing student Dynne Gaborni practices measuring blood pressure on a Langara student. (Erin Boe)

Langara nursing students can be confident they’re receiving superior training after the latest review by theCollege of Registered Nurses of British Columbia.

A full review of Langara’s bachelor of science nursing program was conducted by the CRNBC’s education program review committee in December 2013. The committee regularly reviews the province’s nursing programs.

“The review was so successful that the program was awarded recognition for the next seven years – the longest period offered by the CRNBC, and a distinction reserved for exceptional programs,” said a Langara news release.

“It felt very, very good,” said Janine Lennox, chairwoman of the nursing program. “This is the longest length of time that you can have a recognition process, so we felt that it really shows that we have a very good program and the CRNBC has confidence in our ability to deliver that degree.”

Students proud to be from Langara Nursing

Elsa Nguyen is in her first term of the three-year program.

“I think that it’s incredible that they got that kind of review,” said Nguyen. “It means they’re doing something right here. So it’s actually quite a privilege to be part of a program that’s acknowledged in that way.”

Nguyen, who hopes to be a prenatal nurse, was inspired by all the skilled nurses she met when she gave birth to her own children.

Dynne Gaborni is also a student in her first term of the three-year program. She didn’t know about the program’s recognition but said she was “proud to be in a program that got such a glowing review.”

She hopes to be a pediatric nurse working in BC Children’s Hospital after she graduates from the program.

The program has standing recognition until at least Dec. 31, 2020, when the next CRNBC review will take place.

ISSUU online copy: Langara Voice Vol 46. No 19, pg 3

Nearby church aids flooded neighbourhood house

Posted on March 13, 2014

Locals play ping-pong and bridge at St. Augustine’s Anglican Church since the flood of the Marpole Place Neighbourhood House. (Erin Boe).

Locals play ping-pong and bridge at St. Augustine’s Anglican Church since the flood of the Marpole Place Neighbourhood House. (Erin Boe)

The Marpole Place Neighbourhood House needs more volunteers to help run its programs after a December flood forced them to start working out of a nearby church.

The flooded neighbourhood house, at 1305 West 70th Ave., was closed after a sprinkler burst in its third floor ceiling on the weekend of Dec. 7.

Waiting for repairs

“The damages were significant and so use of the building is not possible until repairs are done,” executive director Cindy McMillan said in an email.

The City of Vancouver, which owns the house, has estimated repairs will take four to six months.

Church donates space

The neighbourhood house’s temporary location is nearby at St. Augustine’s Anglican Church.

“The church has been very generous both with their space and with the cost using their space,” said McMillan. The challenge for the house is that all of the activities take place in the hall, and sometimes simultaneously, so it can be a bit noisy for some participants, she said.

McMillan and Jessica Fiddler, program assistant and volunteer coordinator for the neighbourhood house, are the only two paid staff.

“I used to be full-time, but I’m only part-time because of the flood,” Fiddler said.

She manages the space, but participants are the ones who run programs and handle equipment.

“[The house is] a volunteer- and community-driven space,” Fiddler said.

Volunteers needed

The neighbourhood house is looking for more volunteers to help run the reception, take flyers out to the community, help clean the kitchen following community meals and be a bilingual (Cantonese or Mandarin) mentor for one or two of the computer labs.

Fiddler is also hoping to bring in student volunteers and said Langara students are welcome to contact her if they are interested.

ISSUU online copy: Langara Voice Vol 46. No 18, pg 1

Recent snowfall proves groundhog’s prediction

Posted on March 6, 2014

A snowman on Langara campus that one student dubbed a “snowman fail”. (Erin Boe)

A snowman on Langara campus that one student dubbed a “snowman fail”. (Erin Boe)

Snow made an appearance last week, supposedly confirming Groundhog Day’s prediction of six more weeks of winter after Ontario’s groundhog Wiarton Willie spotted his shadow on Feb. 2.

Langara students shared their thoughts of the snow as it blew in last week.

“I didn’t expect it to snow this big in February,” said continuing studies student Serena Keiichi. “I live in West Vancouver, so it’s up a mountain, and it gets hard to get out when it snows.”

Keiichi said snow affects her drive to school due to ice, making her commute difficult. “I like it if I’m at home, but I don’t like it when I’m out,” she said.

Snow in the mountains, not in the city 

Gursharam Klair throws a snowball at Rishabh Sharma during a heavy snowfall in front of Langara College. (Erin Boe)

Gursharam Klair throws a snowball at Rishabh Sharma during a heavy snowfall in front of Langara College. (Erin Boe)

“I just dislike [the snow] in the city. I like it on the mountains.”

Dunn said he liked how the snow makes everything “seem a little bit quieter, especially at night.”

Mandeep Singh and his friends, Rishabh Sharma and Gursharan Klair, were having a snowball fight on the Langara campus last week. They are all originally from Punjab, India.

“We came from a place where there was no snowfall, and it’s an awesome experience for us,” said Singh. “Everything is very beautiful, and we were playing in the snow.”

Spring around the corner?

David Jones, a meteorologist with Environment Canada, said snowfall at this time of year is not rare. “We’ve had lots of snowstorms in the past at the beginning of March and throughout the winter,” he said.

Jones said there is nothing in particular Environment Canada can “link to any storm regarding climate change.” He said winter will end eventually.

“Spring is definitely on its way, but it comes on its own schedule every year,” said Jones. “It tends to vary and there’s no set week or day that spring will arrive. We just let it come when it happens.”

Jones said Environment Canada gives an accurate forecast of the weather beyond about seven days, depending on the time of year.

According to Environment Canada, Vancouver can expect periods of rain for the coming week.

ISSUU online copy: Langara Voice Vol 46. No 17, pg 5

Next stop: provincials for Langara Falcons

Posted on February 27, 2014

Point guard Brody Greig reaches for a lay up. (Erin Boe)
Point guard Brody Greig reaches for a lay up. (Erin Boe)The Langara Falcons men’s basketball team ended their amazing season by overtaking the Douglas Royals in a 102-59 win last Friday, priming the team for the provincial championship this weekend.

The Langara Falcons men’s basketball team ended their amazing season by overtaking the Douglas Royals in a 102-59 win last Friday, priming the team for the provincial championship this weekend.

This was the last regular season game for the Falcons, winning all but one of their games. They have a first-round bye in the PacWest provincial championships, which begin on Feb. 27. They are currently ranked No.1 in the in the PacWest standings.

Falcons aim high for provincials and nationals

The Falcons won the provincial championships in 2013 and hope to repeat that achievement this year. They also hope to continue on to the national championships where they had finished third last year.

Nationals will be held on Mar. 12 to 15 in Squamish.

“We’ve had a great year,’ said head coach Paul Eberhardt. “We still need to go play the games, but I think the guys are feeling pretty confident about our chances and so am I.”

“I don’t want to jinx it,” added Eberhardt. “But if we win provincials and go to nationals, we’ll probably be the No.1 seed. But there are a lot of good teams. We came close last year so our goal is to get it this year.

Players are also hoping for a repeat win at provincials.

“This year, we hope to win it all going in as the No.1 ranked team,” said power forward Jitinder Lohcham. “There’s a lot of pressure, but we’ve been there before.”

ISSUU online copy: Langara Voice Vol 46. No 16, pg 8

Unemployment numbers are down, but students still struggle to find work

Posted on February 19, 2014

Langara students who want to work appear to be struggling to find jobs, even though statistics show employment is on the rise.

Posted on February 7, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 11.26.41 AM

ISSUU online copy: Langara Voice Vol 46. No 14, pg 7

Looming cuts concerns South Vancouver seniors

Posted on February 9, 2014

Juanita Aquirre, left, and Florchita Bautista, right, standing outside the South Vancouver Neighbourhood House. Photo by Erin Boe.

Juanita Aquirre, left, and Florchita Bautista, right, standing outside the South Vancouver Neighbourhood House. (Erin Boe)

Members of a community centre in South Vancouver are speaking out about looming cuts to postal services and how it will affect local seniors’ ability to pick up their mail.

Late last year, Canada Post announced it will be cutting door-to-door mail delivery services and instead are integrating community mailboxes around the country.

Seniors fear falling outside, mailbox thefts

“[Community mailboxes] are going to be a challenge for those who have mobility challenges,” said Joan Wright, coordinator of the seniors hub at the South Vancouver Neighbourhood House. “A number of seniors in South Vancouver are unable to get out of their homes. They are afraid to use the bus, they’re afraid to walk outside for fear of falling.”

Wright noted that seniors who are afraid to leave their houses because they’re worried about mailbox thefts and muggings will be impacted the most.

Florchita Bautista and Juanita Aquirre also questioned how the cuts will affect their fellow seniors.

“Most of the seniors cannot go out,” said Aquirre, 75. “Not even to the common mailbox outside. I think it will affect them because their mobility is already impaired.”

Bautista, 77, who lives in an apartment, said seniors with limited transportation will also have difficulty retrieving mail.

“I can still go down and get my mail. But for those who are already in assisted living, many of them are not able to go out anymore unless they have transportation,” she said.

Neighbourhood house considering delivery service

Joan Wright is the coordinator of the seniors hub at the South Vancouver Neighbourhood House.

Joan Wright is the coordinator of the seniors hub at the South Vancouver Neighbourhood House.

Wright said the neighbourhood house is looking into potential solutions to the Canada Post cuts.

“One of the things that we are looking at is a one-day-a-week delivery service,” she said. “Many [seniors] are saying that their bills come on the same day and if they had a one-day-a-week service, that would be an appropriate alternative to this dilemma.”

The cuts to postal services will likely begin later this year.

ISSUU online copy: Langara Voice Vol 46. No 14, pg 1

Editor: Gavin Fisher

Langara’s Studio 58 presents Grease for the first time

Posted on January 30, 2014

Acting students rehearse for the upcoming performance. Leana Brown (center) plays Rizzo.

Acting students rehearse for the upcoming performance. Leana Brown (center) plays Rizzo. (Erin Boe)

Studio 58 will begin a three-week run of Grease starting Jan. 30, but it won’t be the production that most people associate with the movie.

This will be director Peter Jorgensen’s debut production with Studio 58, and the first time Studio 58 has performed Grease in the 49 years the program has been running.

Less fluff and Abba

“The version of Grease that most people are accustomed to or are familiar with is the movie version,” said acting student Erik Gow. “However, before it was ever put on film, there was a stage version that was really edgy, there was a lot less fluff and ABBA in it. We’re going back to the original roots of Grease.”

“What we’re doing is more like the original Broadway production,” said acting student Leana Brown, 27. “[It has an] original script and original score, so it’s gonna be a lot more edgy. There’s gonna be a few songs that weren’t in the movie, so that will be an exciting thing to check out.”

Jorgensen, who has done several productions of Grease, had high praise for his cast. “I’ve enjoyed them from the moment we started doing the auditions. I’m really enjoying working with everybody here.”

Tickets still available

Studio 58 will be performing Grease at Langara College from Jan. 30 to Feb. 23.

Studio 58 will be performing Grease at Langara College from Jan. 30 to Feb. 23.

Grease will be on stage at Studio 58 until Feb. 23. Although the first few shows are sold out, tickets are still available for later shows, including a sing-along night on Feb. 5.

There are student rush seats available for $10 on the day of each performance on a first-come, first-served basis. They must be purchased in person the day of – no reservations are accepted. The box office opens at 7 p.m. (for 8 p.m. curtain) & 2 p.m. (for 3 p.m. curtain). All students must have valid ID.

For tickets, visit Tickets Tonight.

Google Maps: Langara Studio 58

Studio 58 can be found in the basement floor of the A building. (Google Maps)

ISSUU online copy: Langara Voice Vol 46. No 13, pg 4

Editor: Nadim Roberts

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